I was working as a Nanny when I first moved to this area. My ward’s name is Adelle. She is creative, intelligent, curious and has a great sense of humor. As she went through the first grade, she struggled with learning how to read, something of which I’m sure many can relate to. We go through learning curves as we develop new skills, so it wasn’t unusual that Adelle had some difficulties. Looking back, I was no exception to this and I could certainly empathize with her frustration. She eventually did learn how to read. Although the routine of school and practice helped, she improved quicker as those supporting her did their best to make it fun and rewarding.

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Every January, the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association, recognizes a slate of the best children's books from the past year. ALSC honors the best nonfiction (the Siebert Award), best translation of a foreign title (the Batchelder Award), best illustrated title (the Caldecott Award), best book about the African American experience (the Coretta Scott King Awards), as well as a host of other "best" books, including the Newbery Award.

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What am I doing this summer? I’m helping middle school students teach NASA scientists. Seriously.

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School's out and twelve lazy weeks stretch out in front of you and your children... weeks waiting to be filled with fun activities. What's on your agenda? Hiking? Kayaking? Barbequing in the backyard? Swimming? A road trip? Reading? Reading!

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StoryWalk™ Gets Kids Outside.

 I learned at a very early age to never utter the words, “There’s nothing to do” in the company of my parents. 

Even now, I shudder at the response.

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 You loved Bear Snores On... the first 25 times, but now you are sick of that sleepy bear and his cave-crashing friends. Your little one, on the other hand? He just keeps bringing you that same book. Every. Single. Night.

 Hearing the same stories or stories with the same characters time and again actually provides real benefits to your child. Learn how to provide those benefits, while retaining a modicum of sanity for yourself.

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read aloud

We all remember the best read alouds from our childhoods: Charlotte's Web, by E.B. White. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, by C.S. Lewis. Where the Red Fern Grows, by Wilson Rawls. Number the Stars, by Lois Lowry. The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame. Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo. A wonderful read aloud stays with us long after the story ends and the book closes. Here are a few of my favorite titles from 2016... ones that might make a wonderful read aloud for your family:

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Read these tips for choosing great read alouds.

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Many parents enjoy snuggling up and reading to their young children. Many of those same parents assume that they should stop reading to their children as they get older and start learning to read, or life becomes busy and reading aloud together stops being a habit.

As a children's librarian, I encourage you to continue to read aloud to your older elementary aged children. Here are just a few reasons:

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family read week

LITTLE CRITTER VISIT CONCLUDES FAMILY READ WEEK

It’s the end of Idaho Family Reading Week, “an annual statewide celebration of family reading,” initiated and supported by the ICFL (Idaho Commission for Libraries). This year, our Clark Fork and Sandpoint branches received visits from Little Critter, a character created by author Mercer Meyer and made popular by his picture books featuring the endearing and furry anthropomorphic character.

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Mock Newberry
 

MOCK NEWBERY COMMITTEE

Every January, the American Library Association recognizes the best books of the year for children. One of ALA's oldest and most prestigious awards is the John Newbery Award. The Newbery is awarded to the most notable work for children (up to age 14), fiction or nonfiction, poetry or prose, published by an American author during the past year. Newbery winners are chosen by that year's Newbery Committee. The 2017 Newbery winner will be announced on Monday, January 23rd. 

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